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11/29/22

More Drawings, An Essay, A Review, and Book Update

Everybody seemed to really like my drawings, so here's some more. These are a few months old, and so not entirely up-to-date, but you can definitely tell they're from my pencil.




The last sketch is of a couple of characters I made up called The Cat and the Dog, which has been temporarily shelved, since I give all my attention to Bink and Mandy.

This "Latest Essay"-"Latest Review" thing didn't work on it, so I'm back to updates on them instead.

Essays are back with "A Republic Pictures Cartoon".

My most recent review is for Get a Horse!. I have a few books more to review, which'll be soon. 

I wrote a first few twenty pages of the book, but after reading Before Mickey, I decided to rewrite the McCay sections. I was not very fond of the book, however. I will soon tell why in a review.

For my book, can anybody tell me if Enchanted Drawings by Charles Solomon is helpful at all as a Golden Age history? Did he interview the participants at all?

Have a good time for now!

11 comments:

  1. Of course, Republic also released (in Trucolor), four Jerky Journeys cartoons, The Three Minnies, Romantic Rombolia, Beyond Civilization to Texas and Bungle in the Jungle, produced by Leonard L. Levinson under the name Impossible Pictures. They were made shortly after the Charley Horse.
    By the way, Ed Love worked at Lantz before 1949, his last cartoon there was The Drooler's Delight.
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    1. The BCDB (https://www.bcdb.com/cartoons/Other_Studios/R/Republic_Pictures/) didn't act like there weren't that many, but thanks for the info! I have put this in the article).

      You can comment on the essays if you like, Mark, if there was some problem.

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  2. Do you often draw on lined notebook paper? That used to drive my mother crazy. "Notebook paper is for writing! Draw in your sketchbook!" But I did it anyway, because I used to draw on whatever paper was handy, and also because the ruled lines helped me with proportion and perspective (though I usually turned the page on its side, so the lines were vertical).

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    1. Usually. I try to save good paper for nice stuff. I'm a cheapskate.

      Delete
  3. Your entire blog-list seems to have disappeared - can't see anything.

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    1. Click "links" in the tabs above.

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    2. I think I'd prefer a 'like-for-like' situation, BH, where other blogs are visible in your blog list down the righthand side of the page (like mine). I suspect that most readers won't bother looking for links unless they can see them in front of them without having to search.

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    3. I can't for many reasons, but I could move the link to the "Links" page to the right, if you want.

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    4. You had your links down the side of your blog just a few days ago though. Tell you what, just forget it - remove my blog from your links and I'll remove yours from my list. And switch to blank paper - the lines obscure your artwork and it just doesn't look like a professional presentation. If you were going for an interview, you wouldn't show a potential employer your work on lined paper and expect to be taken seriously. You want it to look the best it can and lined paper prevents this.

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    5. I took those down because I wanted to have a page where I EXPLAINED what each one was. Since you would prefer yours on the side, I just put you there separately. I don't want to take down your blog, or you mine! I hope I didn't give you a bad impression, like I was messing with you or anything.

      I'll take your advice, since you're an artist, but I save my GOOD art for when I send email portfolios. If you have any recommendations, gosh that'd be swell, Wally.

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    6. Nah, it just felt to me that being in a separate links section was an extra barrier that prevented people seeing my link at a casual glance. I'll add your link back to my own list. If you feel that you draw better (or easier) on lined paper, put a lined guide under a blank piece and draw on that, then remove the lined guide when you scan the page.

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Stay clean!

Dedicated to Winsor, for starting it; to Walt, for refining it; and to Tex, for expanding it.